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14 things to do in Rimini - Visit Rimini

Visit Rimini

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14 things to do in Rimini



Rimini, for a relatively small city, has a huge amount of things to do, and here we’ve tried to give you an introductory broad choice of what’s on offer. We’ve tried to take into account Rimini for sightseeing, for the sports enthusiasts, for the young and the old, and for families.

Obviously it’s just an introduction – feel free to browse around visit-rimini for more info.
And, without further ado, and in no particular order


1 Walk back in time over the Ponte Tiberio


The 2000 Year Old Ponte di Tiberio

Rimini’s Ponte di Tiberio – the Tiberius bridge is 2000 years old, and links the city centre to the picturesque Borgo San Giuliano. It’s hard to describe the feeling of walking across this sturdy, beautiful bridge, following the footesteps of people from the time of the Roman Empire (Rimini was founded by the Romans, as Ariminum), while surrounded by modern life – cars, bicycles, mopeds etc. The bridge also takes a special place in most of Rimini’s big festivals including the Notte Rosa


2 Drink a morning Cappucino in Piazza Cavour


piazza-cavour-lookinglass

Rimini’s city centre is charming, and perhaps its most charming square is Piazza Cavour. The centre of the city’s administration, since the middle ages, it’s always a lively place (in particular on Wednesdays and Saturdays, when it’s taken over by the weekly market stalls). There are a number of cafes here, where you can sit down and enjoy a morning cappucino (never after 11.00am!), while watching the world pass by.


3 Go cycling around Rimini


Because Rimini is relatively small, and flat, it makes it an ideal place for cycling around – indeed, during the summer months, it seems like the whole city abandons their cars in favour of vintage bikes. The city has also invested heavily in bicycle paths, which mean you can pass up and down the lungomare seafront with ease (particularly good for families with small children. There’s also the long stretch of parkland that connects the seafront (Piazzale Kennedy) all the way to the Augustus Arch. Many of the hotels in the city make Bicycles available to guests, so try to avail of it – it’s definitely the easiest way to enjoy the city.


4 Tour Roman Rimini (Ariminum)


arco-agosto-rimini

One of the ways to focus your choices in Rimini, is to choose one particular aspect of the city to enjoy. One of these is to tour Roman Rimini. The city was founded by the Romans, and has a number of important and well preserved ruins. To make it easier for you, we’ve detailed a full walking tour of Roman Rimini here.


5 Enjoy Sports on the Beach


Rimini’s beachfront is divided up and licenced out to operators who manage the beach umbrellas, bars, etc. Some visitors dislike this parceling out of the huge beachfront – though there are a number of free beaches, and legally guaranteed access to the seashore – but whatever you think of that, the advantage is that there are loads of facilities on offer. Head down to the beachfront and you’ll see the beach volleyball courts, beach tennis, and lots of other activities – some beaches even have fully equipped gyms! Most facilities are free to those who have hired a lounger/beach umbrella – enquire with the local attendants.


6 Discover the roots of the Renaissance, in the Tempio Malatestiano


Rimini's Tempio Malatestiano in a different light

Rimini’s most famous church, the Tempio Malatestiano is a beautiful and intriguing monument – the first masterpiece built by the ‘renaissance man’ architect Leon Battista Alberti, commissioned by Rimini’s ruling lord Sigismondo Pandolfo Malatesta. The Tempio, with its classical influences, and use of the zodiac, was described by Pope Pius II – a sworn enemy of Sigismondo Malatesta – as being “full of pagan gods and profane things”. Hosting important artworks by Giotto, Agostino di Duccio, and Piero della Francesca, the Tempio Malatestiano is one of the key works of Italian architecture from the 1400s.

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